Aging Americans: Stranded Without Options

Overview

The demographics of the United States will change dramatically during the next 25 years as more baby boomers reach their 60s, 70s, and beyond. The U.S. Census Bureau projects that the number of Americans age 65 or older will swell from 35 million to more than 62 million by 2025- nearly an 80 percent increase. As people grow older today. they often become less willing or able to drive, making it necessary to depend on alternative methods of transportation.

Transit Equity Matters: An Equity Index and Regional Analysis of the Red Line and Two Other Proposed CTA Transit Extensions

Overview

For the last six years, DCP, a faith-based organization serving Greater Roseland, has conducted its most far-reaching community organizing effort: the CTA Red Line Extension Campaign. This campaign addresses a 38-year history of neglect by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) to extend CTA's Red Line to Chicago's far south side city limits, the most job inaccessible area of Chicago.

On The Ground With Comprehensive Community Initiatives

Overview

This publication summarizes the major programs of ten initiatives, including sources and amounts of funding as well as positive individual and neighborhood impacts. Some of these initiatives began with a comprehensive approach in the 1990s, while others began as single purpose initiatives and gradually became comprehensive over many years. This study highlights proven elements of each initiative's program. It was not intended to be, nor was it conducted as, an evaluation. The 10 initiatives are Bethel New Life in Chicago, IL Chinatown Community Development Center in San Francisco, CA Chicanos Por La Causa in Phoenix, AZ Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative in Roxbury, MA Greater Williamsburg Collaborative in Brooklyn, NY Marshall Heights Community Development Organization in Washington, D.C. Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council in Bronx, NY Neighborhood and Family Initiative Collaborative in Milwaukee, WI Community Building In Partnership in Baltimore, MD and Vollintine-Evergreen Community Association in Memphis, TN.

Discrimination and Mortgage Lending in America

Overview

A summary of the disparate impact of sub-prime mortgage lending on African Americans

The Future of Fair Housing: Report of the National Commission on Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

Overview

Forty years ago, Congress passed Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (the “Fair Housing Act”), which prohibits discrimination in public and private housing markets that is based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, or familial status. The Act requires communities and the federal government to proactively further fair housing residential integration, and equal opportunity goals; however, equal opportunity in housing remains a major challenge, with collateral impact far beyond four walls and a roof.

Building a Better Urban Future: New Directions for Housing Policies in Weak Market Cities

Overview

There are few tasks more important and more necessary in American society today than the regeneration of “weak market cities.” This paper outlines an extensive list of housing strategies for change in these cities as part of their revitalization efforts. It is intended to help CDCs, government agencies, lenders, community members, and foundations assess the effectiveness of current revitalization strategies and priorities in weak market cities; develop new, effective goals and strategies; and prioritize the allotment of resources to best achieve these goals.

Driven To Spend: Pumping Dollars out of Our Households and Communities

Overview

The Surface Transportation Policy Project (STPP) and the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) have released a report that examines transportation costs and the effect of gas prices on family budgets. The study ranks 28 metropolitan areas on their combined transportation and housing costs and recommends specific actions that federal, state, and local governments can take to reduce the burden of transportation costs on families.

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

Overview

The devastation wrought by hurricane Katrina laid bare many of the disparities that continue to separate Americans by race and class. One disparity that was immediately apparent in Katrina’s aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area’s populations that lacked access to an automobile. These households, largely dependent on the limited emergency public transportation available to evacuate the city in advance of the storm, were the most likely to be left behind. In New Orleans, this population seemed quite large in size – and overwhelmingly black. In this paper, we document differences in car-ownership rates between racial and socioeconomic groups. We present patterns for the nation as a whole as well as for the pre-Katrina New Orleans metropolitan area using data from the 2000 5% Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) of the U.S. Census of Population and Housing. We also present estimates of the number of people for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we explore the relationship between residential housing segregation and spatial proximity to other households without access to automobiles among African-Americans.

Are We There Yet? Assessing the Performance of State Departments of Transportation on Accommodating Bicycles and Pedestrians

Overview

The study looked closely at four topics: statewide bicycle and pedestrian plans, accommodating bicycles in state highway projects, providing sidewalks for pedestrians in state highway projects located in urban areas, and implementing a statewide Safe Routes to School program. The NCBW reviewed federal legislation, regulations, polices, and guidance, as well as the policies and recommended practices of national organizations including the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). Using these sources, a set of benchmarks was identified and used to assess the current performance of each state DOT. A chart shows all 50 states and their positions on these benchmarks.

Diversity That Works: The American Worker Speaks

Overview

For more than 40 years, corporations across the nation have invested a great deal of energy and resources in the area of diversity. Today diversity is not only part of the culture of many corporations but a core business strategy as well. Yet the business community has struggled to develop a meaningful measure of the effectiveness of diversity and inclusion programs.

Active Transportation for America: The Case for Increased Federal Investment in Bicycling and Walking

Overview

Active Transportation for America makes the case and quantifies the national benefits—for the first time—that increased federal funding in bicycling and walking infrastructure would provide tens of billions of dollars in benefits to all Americans.

The End of the American Dream for Blacks and Latinos: How the Home Mortgage Crisis is Destroying Black and Latino Wealth, Jeopardizing America’s Future Prosperity and How to Fix It

Overview

As the United States slips deeper into its most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression, a crippling blow to families and the long term health of the nation’s economy will occur through massive foreclosures and the spillover destruction of household wealth. Recent foreclosure projections estimate a total of 2.4 million homes lost in 2009 and 9 million lost during 2009-2012. Goldman Sachs estimates a total of 13 million foreclosures on all types of loans through 2014. These projections are based on the mountain of mortgage debt awaiting resets over the next few years, including 2 million more homeowners with sub-prime mortgages scheduled to be reset in early 2009.

Transportation Prescription: Bold New Ideas for Healthy, Equitable Transportation Reform in America

Overview

This report is a great primer to learn about the health and equity impacts of transportation, the related challenges we face as a nation, and the opportunities for reform. It is built on a research foundation and includes policy and program priorities. 

Race, Equity, and Smart Growth: Why People of Color Must Speak for Themselves

Overview

A national equity and smart growth strategy is needed among African Americans and other people of color environmental justice organizations and networks, educational institutions, churches, civil rights groups, professional associations, legal groups, community development corporations, business associations, bankers, and health care providers.

Stranded at the Station

Overview

Stranded at the Station: The Impact of the Financial Crisis in Public Transportation is the first systematic analysis of the conundrum faced by communities and their transit systems: Historic ridership and levels of demand for service, coupled with the worst funding crisis in decades.

More Transit = More Jobs: New Report

Overview

What would happen if 20 metropolitan areas shifted 50% of their highway funds to transit? They would generate 1,123,674 new transit jobs over a five-year period — for a net gain of 180,150 jobs over five years — without a single dollar of new spending. That's the finding of TEN's new study, more Transit=More Jobs. 

Equity in Transportation for People with Disabilities

Overview

Though people with disabilities live in every community, our transportation policy has undermined the Americans with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) promise of equal opportunity in transportation for people with disabilities, resulting in isolation from jobs, housing, health care, and education. As policymakers discuss such important issues as how best to rebuild and repair our nation’s roads, bridges, railways, and ports, and where and how to prioritize investments in public transportation, it is vital that they take into consideration the needs of people with disabilities.

Pages