Fair & Equitable Infrastructure: Investing in Communities & Workers

Overview

This webinar will discuss why federal infrastructure investments matter and how these investments can advance equity and economic opportunity; lift up examples of infrastructure projects already underway that are improving communities and investing in workers who face barriers to employment; and share guiding principles for fair and equitable federal infrastructure investments.

Transportation Equity Caucus Letter of Elimination of DOT Advisory Committee on Transportation Equity

What does gentrification and displacement mean for Equitable Economic Development?

Overview

In many cities, there is much debate about defining and identifying gentrification. There is also a lively debate about the relationship between economic development activities, like new retail or corridor revitalization, and displacement of residents and local businesses. Many city leaders struggle with how to understand how gentrification and displacement impacts their residents, especially low-income residents and communities of color, and what tools to use to address negative impacts. During this webinar, we will engage in a dialogue about these issues with staff from PolicyLink, facilitated by Anita Cozart, Senior Director and featuring Kalima Rose, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Victor Rubin, Vice President of Research.

Moderator:

  • Anita Cozart, Senior Director PolicyLink

Guest Speakers:

  • Kalima Rose, Vice President Strategic Initiatives PolicyLink
  • Victor Rubin, Vice President of Research PolicyLink

Ensuring Equity-Centered Provisions in Upcoming Infrastructure Proposals: A Strategy Discussion Webinar

Overview

  • In this strategy discussion on crafting an infrastructure proposal that would serve as an opportunity to improve the social determinants of health and quality of life for underserved families and communities, experts explored the tools and policy mechanisms that can be used to address health and economic disparities and identified strategies to ensure equity is built into infrastructure legislation. (Scroll down and register for the webinar in order to access the archive.)

Transportation Matters: Closing the Chasm between Housing and Transportation to Foster Communities of Opportunity for All

Overview

"Transportation Matters: Closing the Chasm between Housing and Transportation to Foster Communities of Opportunity for All," by PolicyLink staff member Anita Cozart, appears in the American Bar Association’s Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, volume 25, issue no. 2, © 2017 American Bar Association. It examines the "chasm" that exists between the two sectors and what can be done to break down the barriers and create benefits and opportunities for all. Please note: This information or any portion thereof may not be copied or disseminated in any form or by any means or downloaded or stored in an electronic database or retrieval system without the express written consent of the American Bar Association.

Perspectives on Advancing Economic and Social Equity in Federal Transportation Policy: Briefing papers for the 10/25/12 Forum of the Equity Caucus at Transportation for America

Overview

The following briefs have been prepared by several leading transportation researchers to inform the
dialogue during a forum hosted by the Equity Caucus at Transportation for America in Washington DC
on October 25th, 2012.

Fostering Access to Opportunity HUD’s Proposed Affirmatively Furthering Housing Rule

Overview

The Fair Housing Act of 1968 requires HUD to conduct programs in such a manner that “affirmatively furthers fair housing” – a term that has never been defined. Responding to concerns raised by the Government Accountability Office and stakeholders, the proposed Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule does three key things:
 
  1. Clarifies the definition of AFFH to include actions that expand mobility for all households in opportunity-rich communities, reducing segregation and concentrated poverty – as well as actions that invest in high-poverty communities, expanding opportunity for existing residents.
  2. Improves the process that local jurisdictions undertake to ensure that HUD funds are being used to further fair housing by aligning it with Consolidated Plans for CDBG and HOME allocations and with Public Housing Plans for public housing dollars.
  3. Provides local jurisdictions with consistent data to ensure that grantees can measure their progress on reducing segregation and racially concentrated

Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) Rule is Sound Policy

Overview

While the Fair Housing Act has largely succeeded in outlawing overt housing discrimination, it has been less effective in promoting equal opportunity, in large part because of a lack of clarity and technical support surrounding the mandate to “affirmatively further” fair housing goals.

The AFFH rule provides much-needed clarification of the Fair Housing Act and provides support to HUD grantees that makes grantees better equipped to promote fair housing choice, foster inclusive communities, and increase opportunity for all residents.

AFH Roles Matrix

Overview

In this table, you will find examples of the different types of stakeholders that could be included in the AFH and what expertise and assets they may bring. You will find information on the kinds of data they might have access to, resources and in-kind support they might leverage and policies or programs they could implement to increase access to opportunity and promote fair housing.

This is not meant to be a checklist, but rather a tool for brainstorming potential stakeholders that will amplify the success of the AFH. Keep in mind that not every HUD program participant will need to include all of these players; however, many may play a vital role in ensuring better AFH outcomes, which leads to increased access to opportunity for historically marginalized communities.

Breaking Down Barriers to Opportunity: Transportation and the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing

Overview

Transportation is a tried and proven investment that connects people to what they need to live a good, vibrant life and to be upwardly economically mobile. Transportation connects children to good schools, their parents to good jobs, and ensures access to clinics, libraries, parks and recreation, grocery stores and other essential amenities and services. 
 
The Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) Rule and its companion data tool provide a tremendous resource for planning at the regional and local levels. The AFFH supports integrated assessment and planning approaches that can more closely examine patterns of disinvestment and barriers to opportunity. The AFFH can foster the alignment of investments in transportation, housing, job centers and economic development that fosters access to opportunity for those currently being left out. 
 
This webinar looks at the AFFH rule and how it can be used to promote equitable transportation, transit-oriented development, and opportunity-focused place making. Learn how to get involved in and influence your local AFFH process and how the AFFH data tool can be used as an ongoing resource to support equitable transportation planning. 
 
Speakers included: 
  • Patricia Fron, Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance 
  • Ubax Gardheere, Puget Sound Sage 
  • Jonathan Burch, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning 
  • Emily Chatterjee, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
  • Ben Bakkenta, Puget Sound Regional Council 
  • Sarita Turner, PolicyLink 
  • Anita Cozart, PolicyLink 

Breaking Down Barriers to Opportunity: Transportation and the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Rule PowerPoint Presentation

Overview

This is the powerpoint presentation which accompanies the webinar archive, Breaking Down Barriers to Opportunity: Transportation and the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing.
 
This webinar looks at the AFFH rule and how it can be used to promote equitable transportation, transit-oriented development, and opportunity-focused place making. Learn how to get involved in and influence your local AFFH process and how the AFFH data tool can be used as an ongoing resource to support equitable transportation planning. 
 
Speakers included: 
Patricia Fron, Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance 
Ubax Gardheere, Puget Sound Sage 
Jonathan Burch, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning 
Emily Chatterjee, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
Ben Bakkenta, Puget Sound Regional Council 
Sarita Turner, PolicyLink 
Anita Cozart, PolicyLink 

Subsidizing Congestion: The Multibillion-Dollar Tax Subsidy That's Making Your Commute Worse

Overview

 The federal government provides subsidies through the tax code for employer-provided and employer-paid automobile parking,
transit passes, and some other commuter expenses, but it does so in ways that run counter to the nation’s overall transportation goals. 
 
Those who receive the greatest tax savings from the transit benefit are not the low-income and working Americans who depend on transit the most, but rather higher-income Americans whose employers are more likely to offer transit benefits, who spend more on their transit commutes, and who save a greater share of every dollar spent on transit benefits due to their higher marginal income tax rates. 

Up-to-Date Analysis of Future Workforce Needs in Transit

Overview

Presentation by the Transportation Learning Center on the future workforce needs in  the transportation industry.

Share of Transportation Industry Jobs: African Americans and Hispanics

Overview

Valerie Wilson from the Economic Policy Institute presents data to illustrate the share of jobs created from transportation investments that will be filled by African Americans and Hispanics.

Transportation Update: Where We’ve Gone and What We’ve Learned

Overview

For Americans with Disabilities many transportation services remain stuck in neutral.  For many Americans with Disabilities the prospects and possibilities for going to and from work, school and recreational activities are stuck in neutral. NCD’s report addresses the broad range of surface transportation, including these, and makes recommendations policymakers should use to address these barriers promptly.

Transportation For People With Disabilities: Summary and Recommendations

Overview

Transportation is a critical issue for people with disabilities and is an essential component of equitable communities.The draft principles and issues outlined  in this summary can serve as a starting point as the workgroup continues their efforts to prioritize issues and create action steps towards change.

Weighing Maryland's Economic Future: Assessing the Benefits from the Red and Purple Lines.

Overview

This report shows the numerous economic benefits to the state of Maryland that the Red Line and the Purple Line would deliver. Each tangible benefit tells just one piece of the full story of these projects. Taken together, the evidence is overwhelming that the Red and Purple Lines are a vital investment in Maryland’s future.

RE: Comments on April-May 2015 FTA Capital Investment Grant Rulemaking [Docket No. FTA–2015–0007]

Overview

PolicyLink is pleased that the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has issued guidance for the capital investment grants that (1) prioritize mobility and connectedness for low-income people and transit-dependent populations; and (2) incentivizes the provision of affordable housing close to public transportation.

Testimony from The Transportation Equity Caucus Statement for House Ways and Means Hearing

Overview

Adequate federal transportation investments can lay a strong foundation for economic growth and expand opportunity for millions of people. Strategic federal investments in transportation can transform struggling communities, unleash untapped human potential, and promote local economic development to allow all people to thrive. When transportation funding decisions are driven by economic and social equity, we can build transportation system that works for everyone, regardless of income, race or zip code.

Statement for the Hearing Record: “Dead End, No Turn Around, Danger Ahead: Challenges to the Future of Highway Funding”

Overview

As members of the Transportation Equity Caucus, a diverse coalition of organizations promoting policies that ensure access, mobility, and opportunity for all, we appreciate the opportunity to submit this statement for the record today to express our priorities for the financing of the Highway Trust Fund.

Active Transportation and Equity: Key Challenges and Opportunities from the Field

Overview

As the United States is wrestling with race and class in many arenas, these issues have come to the forefront in the world of walking, bicycling, and Safe Routes to School. Straight talk on equity is welcome when it comes to active transportation, health and safety -- but what does equity and active transportation mean in practice at the local and regional level? Join the National Partnership's webinar to hear why equity is crucial in the world of active transportation, how equity is being prioritized in the field, and learn about best practices in bridging the gap between community need and active transportation's benefits.
 
Speakers:
• Sara Zimmerman, Technical Assistance Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership
• Pedro Arista, Program Manager, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum
• Tamika Butler, Executive Director, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition
• Alyia Smith-Parker, Senior Associate, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, National League of Cities
This webinar is part of a regular series of free webinars brought to you by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership on topics related to Safe Routes to School and other policy and program initiatives that can increase walking and bicycling to school and in daily life.
 

Equity and Transportation

Overview

This webinar is a discussion of equity and transportation. How can we measure the equity impacts of transportation investments? And how can we ensure that walking and biking investments meaningfully address the mobility and safety needs of urban and rural disadvantaged communities while not directly or indirectly leading to the displacement of low-income residents?

Governments and transportation agencies are growing more aware of the need to evaluate the equity impacts of transportation investments. To date, no concise framework or consistent measures have been developed for doing so. Such measures would aid in building a transportation system that provides fair access for all to jobs, goods, services, schools and other important destinations.

Mary Ebeling from SSTI speaks about early work on measuring various dimensions of transportation equity, including affordability, health and safety impacts, and ultimately accessibility across multiple modes. Erika Rincon-Whitcomb from PolicyLink speaks to background on the national transportation equity landscape, focusing on trends and opportunities in the federal arena. She also speaks about her work on prioritizing equity in California’s Active Transportation Program.

Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Starts with Transportation

Overview

The Transportation Equity Caucus applauds President Obama for raising the critical issue of long-term, sustained investment in transportation infrastructure during his State of the Union address.

Transit-based Opportunity—Lessons from Dayton

Overview

The linkages between neighborhoods and academic achievement, health, and life outcomes have been thoroughly documented in research literature in recent decades. A recent story from Dayton, Ohio underscores the importance of transportation equity, and sheds light on the power of public transit to link marginalized communities to opportunities throughout a region with differentially located assets.

Business Impact Mitigations for Transit Projects

Overview

Across the country, new light rail and bus rapid transit (BRT) projects are creating faster and more affordable transportation options for low-income residents and people of color. In several cities, these projects are also expanding opportunities for small, local, minority-, women-, and immigrant-owned businesses to reach new customers and benefit from the streetscape and other new investments in their neighborhoods.

This report outlines successful strategies that have been used to help businesses survive and thrive in two cities—Seattle, Washington, and St. Paul, Minnesota—that have recently built extensive new light rail lines through neighborhoods rich with small, local, minority- and immigrant-owned businesses.

Building Bridges to Economic Opportunity (Audio and Transcript)

Overview

Affordable and accessible transportation connects people to jobs, schools, affordable housing, health care, grocery stores, and other basic necessities. The Obama administration and the U.S. Department of Transportation recently proposed major transportation legislation to address the urgent transit challenges facing urban, suburban, and rural communities. At the same time, local leaders are exploring strategies aimed at helping low-income people in communities where lack of transportation is a major barrier to economic opportunity. 

Spotlight on Poverty & OpportunityPolicyLinkThe Leadership Conference Education Fund, the Transportation Equity Caucus, the Center for Social Inclusion, the Amalgamated Transit Union, and the Coalition on Human Needs will host a national audio conference to explore several examples of nationwide and local action on this issue:

Sheila Williams of the Memphis Bus Riders Union will speak about the organization’s efforts  to expand transportation options for disadvantaged workers to commute to work.  

Shefali Ranganathan of the PolicyLink will highlight the efforts of the The Leadership Conference) to advance a national agenda for equitable transportation investment.

Adie Tomer, Senior Research Associate and Associate Fellow at The Brookings Institution's Listen to the audio conference here

Read transcript for the audio conference here

Read blog post about the audio conference here

Comments Submitted by PolicyLink on U.S. DOT's Proposed State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

PolicyLink is pleased to offer the following comments on the proposed rulemaking on Statewide, Nonmetropolitan, and Metropolitan Transportation Planning to the U.S Department of Transportation’s (U.S. DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Authority (FTA). 

Comments Submitted by 9to5 on U.S. DOT's Proposed State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

On behalf of the members and constituents of 9to5, National Association of Working Women, the following comments are offered on proposed rulemaking on Statewide, Nonmetropolitan, and Metropolitan Transportation Planning to the U.S Department of Transportation’s (U.S. DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Authority (FTA).

Comments Submitted by Enterprise Community Partners on Proposed State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

Enterprise Community Partners (Enterprise) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the joint Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) – Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Proposed Rule for Statewide and Nonmetropolitan Planning and Metropolitan Transportation Planning

Comments Submitted by National Housing Conference on Proposed State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

The National Housing Conference (NHC) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the joint Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) – Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Proposed Rule for Statewide and Nonmetropolitan Planning and Metropolitan Transportation Planning.

Natural Resources Defense Council Comments on State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is pleased to submit comments on the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for Statewide and Nonmetropolitan Transportation Planning and Metropolitan Transportation Planning documents. This NPRM sets the stage for regions to establish a framework for efficient planning and better use of both federal and local resources to create a coordinated metropolitan planning structure.

Can Shared Mobility Help Low-Income People Access Opportunity?

Overview

Shared-mobility programs like bike-share and car-share have significant potential to benefit low-income users, yet often do not reach that population. This report examines the specific opportunities and challenges facing shared mobility programs in expanding services to low-income communities.

The New Movement: Bike Equity Today

Overview

This report is the culmination of several years of efforts within the League to elevate community voices to the national advocacy stage and show the existing diversity in the bike movement. For this publication, we have interviewed dozens of individuals and organizations, as well as tapped previous blog posts, magazine articles, reports and more. 

Comments Submitted by PolicyLink to USDOT on National Performance Measures for the Highway Safety Improvement Program

Overview

PolicyLink is pleased to offer the following comments on the proposed rulemaking on the National Performance Management Measures for the Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (U.S. DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). As a leader in the movement to build more equitable infrastructures, PolicyLink is supportive of policies and investments that enhance access to safe and reliable transportation options. Moreover, safe, accessible transportation infrastructure – including streets, crosswalks and sidewalks – are critical to connecting people to economic opportunity.

Untapped Resources, Untapped Labor Pool: Using Federal Highway Funds to Prepare Women for Careers in Construction

Overview

Federal highway funding offers states a stable resource that can support activities that improve women’s entry into and success in the construction trades. This briefing highlights examples of how two states, Maryland and Oregon, are using this funding to improve diversity in the highway construction workforce. The briefing paper is based on a review of literature, pre-apprenticeship state-level evaluations and progress reports, and interviews with key stakeholders from Oregon, the tradeswomen community, and the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Job Displacement and the Duration of Joblessness: The Role of Spatial Mismatch

Overview

This paper presents a new approach to the measurement of the effects of spatial mismatch that takes advantage of matched employer-employee administrative data integrated with a person-specific job accessibility measure, as well as demographic and neighborhood characteristics. The basic hypothesis is that if spatial mismatch is present, then improved accessibility to appropriate jobs should shorten the duration of unemployment. 

Left at the Station: A Civil Rights Perspective on Transit Justice in the Front Range

Overview

9to5 Colorado spoke with residents living in the West Corridor of RTD’s light rail expansion. This report highlights key community concerns of affordability, safety, schedule changes, and gentrification among low-income communities. Additionally, it provides recommendations for an equitable, just, and accessible transit system along the Front Range.

Smart Transit for a Strong Economy: Why New Orleans Should Invest in a CBD Transit Hub

Overview

Today, we are excited to release our report, “Smart Transit for a Strong Economy:  Why New Orleans Should Invest in a CBD Transit Hub“.  The report highlights the current situation at the downtown transit hub, features solutions from other cities that have taken advantage of federal funding opportunities and public-private partnerships to invest in their downtown transit hubs and supports our position that we must re-imagine our central transit hub as more than just a utilitarian place for buses and passengers, but as a gateway into the surrounding community through which many citizens and visitors pass.  As such, it deserves to leave a powerful impression as a matter of civic pride.

Rail-Trail Supreme Court Decision

Overview

On March 10, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision in the case involving a rail corridor formerly on federal land that is now privately owned (Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust et al. v. United States). The ruling affects a specific type of rail corridor that does not meet the criteria below.

Building the Foundation for Surface Transportation Reauthorization

Overview

Statement for the record submitted to the House of Respresentatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing, Jan 14, 2014. 

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