Fair & Equitable Infrastructure: Investing in Communities & Workers

Overview

This webinar will discuss why federal infrastructure investments matter and how these investments can advance equity and economic opportunity; lift up examples of infrastructure projects already underway that are improving communities and investing in workers who face barriers to employment; and share guiding principles for fair and equitable federal infrastructure investments.

Share of Transportation Industry Jobs: African Americans and Hispanics

Overview

Valerie Wilson from the Economic Policy Institute presents data to illustrate the share of jobs created from transportation investments that will be filled by African Americans and Hispanics.

Transportation Update: Where We’ve Gone and What We’ve Learned

Overview

For Americans with Disabilities many transportation services remain stuck in neutral.  For many Americans with Disabilities the prospects and possibilities for going to and from work, school and recreational activities are stuck in neutral. NCD’s report addresses the broad range of surface transportation, including these, and makes recommendations policymakers should use to address these barriers promptly.

Weighing Maryland's Economic Future: Assessing the Benefits from the Red and Purple Lines.

Overview

This report shows the numerous economic benefits to the state of Maryland that the Red Line and the Purple Line would deliver. Each tangible benefit tells just one piece of the full story of these projects. Taken together, the evidence is overwhelming that the Red and Purple Lines are a vital investment in Maryland’s future.

Equity and Transportation

Overview

This webinar is a discussion of equity and transportation. How can we measure the equity impacts of transportation investments? And how can we ensure that walking and biking investments meaningfully address the mobility and safety needs of urban and rural disadvantaged communities while not directly or indirectly leading to the displacement of low-income residents?

Governments and transportation agencies are growing more aware of the need to evaluate the equity impacts of transportation investments. To date, no concise framework or consistent measures have been developed for doing so. Such measures would aid in building a transportation system that provides fair access for all to jobs, goods, services, schools and other important destinations.

Mary Ebeling from SSTI speaks about early work on measuring various dimensions of transportation equity, including affordability, health and safety impacts, and ultimately accessibility across multiple modes. Erika Rincon-Whitcomb from PolicyLink speaks to background on the national transportation equity landscape, focusing on trends and opportunities in the federal arena. She also speaks about her work on prioritizing equity in California’s Active Transportation Program.

Comments Submitted by 9to5 on U.S. DOT's Proposed State and Metropolitan Planning Guidance

Overview

On behalf of the members and constituents of 9to5, National Association of Working Women, the following comments are offered on proposed rulemaking on Statewide, Nonmetropolitan, and Metropolitan Transportation Planning to the U.S Department of Transportation’s (U.S. DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Authority (FTA).

Building the Foundation for Surface Transportation Reauthorization

Overview

Statement for the record submitted to the House of Respresentatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing, Jan 14, 2014. 

The State of Transit in New Orleans: The Need for a More Efficient, Equitable, and Sustainable System

Overview

Ride New Orleans’ analysis in this report highlights several critical findings.

  1. By the end of 2012, just 36% of the pre-Katrina transit service offered by the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (RTA) in 2005 had been restored – although 86% of New Orleans’ population had returned to the city.
  2. Service reductions have been worst in areas where transit service is needed most: low-income neighborhoods, communities of color, and areas where people have less access to personal vehicles
  3. The RTA’s  is operating at a significant deficit every year and will soon run out of cash reserve funds. Some of the basic causes of the deficit are clear: our transit system costs more to operate than comparable systems and it charges lower fares. Yet, to date, the conversation about correcting the deficit has centered only on a potential fare increase. The findings in this report indicate that any sustainable solution to the deficit will need to involve lowering the costs of service as well as increasing revenues of all types.

Filling the Financing Gap for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development

Overview

Filling the Financing Gap for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development describes the key components of a model system for equitable TOD, the most common challenges regional actors face in moving equitable TOD projects forward and a variety of strategies partners can use to address these challenges. The report includes recommendations for approaches to leveraging public and private funds, coordinating multiple actors, involving the community and managing issues around land use and assembly. LIIF and Enterprise co-authored the paper with support from Living Cities.

Transportation 101: An Introduction to Federal Transportation Policy

Overview

Do you want to learn a little more about federal transportation policy, like the history of the program, how the Interstate System was started, how earmarks came to be so prevalent or how the federal role in funding transportation has changed throughout the years? With Congress considering the next six-year reauthorization, T4 America has put together this guidebook to provide some clarity on the history of the program, how it works (or doesn’t work) today and the new challenges facing us for the next 50 years.

Transit Access and Zero-Vehicle Households

Overview

Millions of zero-vehicle households live in areas well served by transit. Yet hundreds of thousands of zero-vehicle households live out of transit's reach, particularly in the South and in the suburbs. And those with transit access still cannot reach a majority of jobs in metro areas within 90 minutes. Based on these trends, leaders must recognize these households' unique mobility needs and aim to improve job accessibility through sound policy. 

Stranded at the Station

Overview

Stranded at the Station: The Impact of the Financial Crisis in Public Transportation is the first systematic analysis of the conundrum faced by communities and their transit systems: Historic ridership and levels of demand for service, coupled with the worst funding crisis in decades.